Populations of elephants, which once showed promising signs of recovery, could be at risk due to a recent surge in poaching for the illegal ivory trade. (photo by Oleg Znamenskiy)
Although international trade in rhino horn has been banned since 1977, demand remains high and fuels rhino poaching in both Africa and Asia. (photo by Johan Swanepoel)
George Clooney’s Satellite Sentinel Project has joined the fight against wildlife trafficking. (photo by Denis Makarenko)
Fewer than 400 Sumatran tigers exist today. (photo by Mark Higgins)
Robert Cardillo welcomes everyone to the Presidential Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking Symposium. (photo by Brian Murphy, ODNI Public Affairs)

“Wildlife trafficking contributes billions of dollars to the illegal economy, fuels instability and undermines human security.”

- Robert Cardillo

The African grey parrot has experienced significant population declines in the wild. (photo by Mikael Damkier)

“The Intelligence Community’s involvement is critical. Your tools and technology can be applied and intelligence-led law enforcement can help thwart this illicit activity.”

- Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Daniel Foote

President Barack Obama, shown during a visit to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence at their Liberty Crossing complex, McLean, Va., created the Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking in 2013. (photo by Brian Murphy, ODNI Public Affairs)

“The entire world has a stake in protecting the world’s iconic animals, and the United States is strongly committed to meeting its obligation to help preserve the Earth’s natural beauty for future generations.”

- President Barack Obama

DNI James Clapper signs a Presidential Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking Symposium poster prior to the start of the two-day event. (photo by Brian Murphy, ODNI Public Affairs)
Chinese demand for the pangolin, a scale-covered anteater, is forcing the endangered animals closer to extinction. (courtesy photo)

“I think we are faced with a clear moral imperative. This is not a victimless crime. Lives are at risk, both human and wildlife.”

- DNI James Clapper

Despite laws protecting sea turtles in most countries, illegal trade of eggs, meat and shells continues to be a threat. (photo by Rich Carey)
Dr. Odean Serrano (third from right) poses for a photo with Clapper and other key leaders involved in the Presidential Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking symposium. (photo by Brian Murphy, ODNI Public Affairs)
NGA’s Combating Wildlife Trafficking public website. (courtesy image)
The Amur leopard is poached largely for its beautiful, spotted fur. (courtesy photo)
Detail from from a Transnational Organized Crime overview, citing the worldwide cost of environmental crimes, including wildlife trafficking. (Click to view the full graphic.)
Daniel Ashe (left) and Daniel Foote address the crowd during the first day of the Combating Wildlife Trafficking Symposium. (photos by Brian Murphy, ODNI Public Affairs)
In the 1980s, an estimated 100,000 elephants were killed each year and up to 80 percent of herds were lost in some regions. (photo by Donovan van Staden)
An African rhino. (photo by Johan Swanepoel)
A century ago, there were roughly 230,000 orangutans, but today the number has dropped to an estimated 45,000–69,000 Bornean and 7,500 Sumatran orangutans. (photo by Sergey Uryadnikov)

“We absolutely can’t afford to see entire species wiped off this planet because we failed to effectively work together here at home and with our international partners.”

- DNI James Clapper

The good news is that progress is being made due to concerted efforts by the international community:

  • There are now broad federal restrictions on the U.S. domestic trade in African elephant ivory.
  • China has an agreement to enact import/export bans on ivory.
  • A collective effort was also instrumental in influencing the United Nations General Assembly to approve its first-ever resolution on wildlife trafficking.
Clapper testifies during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Feb. 9. (photo by Brian Murphy, ODNI Public Affairs)
The African elephant population has declined by about 20 percent over the last decade. (photo by Lara Zanarini)

The DNI oversees the U.S. Intelligence Community and serves as principal adviser to the President on intelligence issues related to national security.

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Office of the DNI

Office of the DNI

The DNI oversees the U.S. Intelligence Community and serves as principal adviser to the President on intelligence issues related to national security.

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